Pretty girls brought business to Miami drive-ins of the 1950s
Date: 9/26/2015 Album ID: 1978548
"There seems to be a race going on among Miami drive-in restaurant owners to see who can clothe curvaceous curb cuties in the tightest sweaters and the briefest shorts," The Miami Herald reported in 1952. "Within metropolitan city limits, there are some 150 drive-in hasheries operating throughout the year," reporter Pat Murphy wrote. "Of these roadside restaurants, about seven-eighths of them are known to have curb girls -- 'car hops,' if you please -- sprinting between car and kitchen wearing uniforms with little more fabric than two handkerchiefs."
Car hop Bobby Johnson. Ran as a file photo with a January 8, 1978 story: Malls, Climate Drove Out South Florida Drive-Ins. The article noted that running out to get the order and then deliver the food and pick up trays was not labor efficient. Nor did people see much point to wilting outside in the summer heat, not when air-conditioning became a prime feature of the new self-service takeouts. The 1978 caption on this photo was The Car Hop...ogled by patrons.<br><br>Date: June 23, 1961<br>Photographer: Dan McCoy/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald
Julie Black copes with Big Deal Wolf. According to the adjacent article, After suffering through his 'stick with me Baby and you'll be in pictures' line, the carhop frequently sees this character drop a miserly tip which thuds painfully on the tray. Published July 11, 1954.<br><br>Date Shot: May 18, 1954<br>Photographer: John Walther/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald
Tiny Joyce Irwin has far-reaching problem. According to the adjacent article, Then there's the case of the gangling, long-gammed carhop who always gets stuck with the ground-hugging sports cars which she waits on in a stoop-shouldered position. The short curb girls usually have to lift trays up to the towering window ledge of a cross-country truck. Published July 11, 1954.<br><br>Date Shot: May 19, 1954<br>Photographer: John Walther/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald
Two car hops carrying trays of Schaefer beer. Probably shot for the Sunday, July 11, 1954 article on car hops. According to that article, Drive-ins depend on autos for business, and a lot of auto drivers are men, and when a hungry man spots a gal clad in recklessly brief shorts and tight sweater, he'll drive blocks out of his way to stop and gape while he gobbles.<br><br>Date Shot: May 18, 1954<br>Photographer: John Walther/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald
Car hop Jerry Ayers serves Bob Bates from Mt. Vernon N.Y. According to the adjacent story, Al Cooper, co-owner of a booming drive-in business in North Bay Village, has been in the food serving bonanza 20 years, but it wasn't until recently that he clearly saw the lucre-lure of shorts, shapes and shimmies. 'Business has darned near doubled,' he said. Published July 20, 1952. *This photo is very high in contrast.<br><br>Date Shot: June 28, 1952<br>Photographer: Bill Sanders/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald
Serving Barbara Lee is car hop Julienne LaVoie. According to the adjacent story One drive-in manager on NW 36th Street, whose gals still wear the full-length slacks, said: 'Shorts and sweaters have nothing to do with getting customers. It's a matter of food, a girl's charm and location.' There was only one car on that lot at the time, a busy Saturday night. Published July 20, 1952. *This photo is very high in contrast.<br><br>Date Shot: June 28, 1952<br>Photographer: Bill Sanders/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald
Car hop at Colonel Jim's Tasty Thrill drive in, on 79th Street Causeway in Miami Beach. Sign says Blink Lights for Service. Published July 20, 1952, with caption Drive-in...Food and cheesecake. According to the adjacent story: The disenchanting facet of this fiendish wiggle-your-hips-and-woo-the-cars plot is that the gals know their prowess, too. In short, the smile and the cuddlesome 'howdy' is to ease the loot out of your pocket, brother.<br><br>Date Shot: June 28, 1952<br>Photographer: Bill Sanders/Miami Herald Staff<br>Copyright: The Miami Herald